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Archive for the ‘Colorectal Cancer Screening’ Category

From the Physician’s Desk … Weekly Blog!

Don’t forget to visit … www.LegacyEducators.org and click on “Cancer Information”

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MARCH IS COLON CANCER AWARENESS MONTH!

What would you do…if you could truly prevent hearing the double “C” word = Colon Cancer?

Take a moment to watch these very educational videos – this may save your life!

About Colon Cancer

Colonoscopy Procedure

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Liver in the Body

Inside your abdomen

The Scope It Out 5K run/walk is a way to support the Chris4Life Colon Cancer Foundation. Their goal is to bring awareness to this preventable form of cancer and to permanently eliminate the threat of colon cancer through discovery of a cure.

You can register to support a team by following link.  Go to https://fundraising.active.com/fundraiser/ASBCCancerMinistry
to donate and/or register to join the team.
 
To Register as a team member – Click ‘Register Now’, fill out all necessary information and choose the ‘Team Member’ category. Then select the team name, ASBC Cancer Ministry (Gaither), from the drop down list to register. Please consider donating to our ASBC team instead of “yourself”. 
 
To Donate to team ASBC Cancer Ministry –  click on ‘Donate Now’. Your tax deductible donation will be made towards ASBC Cancer Ministry Team. Thank you!

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Remember …

Ipsa Scientia Potestas est    ———  Knowledge itself is power!

Don’t forget to visit my website … www.LegacyEducators.org 

Your Family Friendly Doc … Dr McGann!  

See you next week…

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From the Physician’s Desk … Weekly Blog! 

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Colorectal cancer screening in older adults who have never been screened  (New Information: JUL 2014)

Discontinuing screening — The decision to stop screening should depend upon whether an individual patient’s life expectancy justifies the risk and inconvenience of screening. Age alone is only one determinant of the impact of screening; in one modeling study, screening individuals aged 67 to 69 with three or more comorbidities (chronic illnesses – diabetes, heart disease, etc.,)  would save fewer lives than screening individuals aged 75 to 79 with no comorbidity (81 versus 459 lives saved per 100,000).

Many of the “Baby Boomers” are living longer and healthier lives, so continued screening may be justified.

At 93yo Dr. Eugster hopes to turn the heads of "Sexy 70yo on the beach!"

At 93yo Dr. Eugster hopes to turn the heads of “Sexy 70yo on the beach!”

Most guidelines recommend that screening for colorectal cancer stop when the patient’s life expectancy is less than 10 years. Which is a difficult concept for many patients to face…who will raise their hands to say they are likely to live less than 10 years? Who truly knows?  The US Prevention Study Task Force (USPSTF) guidelines recommend that patients over age 85 not be screened, and recommend against screening in adults 76 to 85 years, unless there are individual considerations that favor screening.

Older adults with no prior screening — One-time screening in older adults who have never been screened (23 percent of US elderly individuals) appears to be cost-effective up to age 86 years, based on results of a modeling study. In this simulation study, colonoscopy was cost-effective to age 83 years, sigmoidoscopy to 84 years, and fecal immunochemistry testing to 86 years for patients without comorbidity and at average risk for CRC. Colonoscopy was the most effective, and most expensive, strategy for one-time screening.

Signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer may cause one or more of the symptoms below.  However, most of these symptoms are more often caused by conditions other than colorectal cancer, such as infection, hemorrhoids, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Still, if you have any of these problems, it’s important to see your doctor so the cause can be found and treated, if needed.

  • A change in bowel habits, such as diarrhea, constipation, or narrowing of the stool, that lasts for more than a few days
  • A feeling that you need to have a bowel movement that is not relieved by doing so
  • Rectal bleeding, dark stools, or blood in the stool (often, though, the stool will look normal)
  • Cramping or abdominal (belly) pain
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Unintended weight loss
  • And any other signs of concerns…

SCREENING PEOPLE AT INCREASED RISK — The evidence for how high-risk patients should be screened is weaker than for average-risk patients. Thus, guidelines are based mainly upon arguments relating to knowledge of the biology of colorectal cancer (CRC):

If the patient is at risk for earlier onset CRC (eg, first-degree relative (mother, sister, brother etc.,) with onset of CRC before age 50), screening should begin earlier.

If the patient is at risk for more rapid progression of disease, screening should be performed more frequently.

If the patient is at risk for more proximal lesions (eg, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer [HNPCC]), screening should be performed with colonoscopy.

If the patient is at risk for a greatly increased incidence of disease (eg, HNPCC or familial adenomatous polyposis [FAP]), they should be screened with colonoscopy, the most sensitive test for complete examination of the colon.

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Remember …

Ipsa Scientia Potestas est    ———  Knowledge itself is power!

Don’t forget to visit my website … www.LegacyEducators.org 

Your Family Friendly Doc … Dr McGann!  

See you next week…

Read Full Post »